About your Search

20121222
20121230
STATION
CSPAN2 23
CNBC 18
CSPAN 14
CNNW 7
FBC 7
KCSM (PBS) 6
KQED (PBS) 5
WHUT (Howard University Television) 4
KRCB (PBS) 3
LINKTV 2
MSNBCW 2
SFGTV2 2
KQEH (PBS) 1
WBAL (NBC) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 102
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 111 (some duplicates have been removed)
are moral and big government isn't." we are at freedom fest in las vegas, where mr. forbes is speaking. mr. forbes, why is that free markets are moreover, but that government isn't. with an example of that? >> remake the emphasis of big government. going back to it james madison defined. but in terms of big government not being moral, it is the opposite of what it purports to do and creates an environment we have less ability to get ahead increased dependency and not a sense of independence. it plessis crony capitalism, which hurts oil entrepreneurship and creativity. all the things the government says it does hopes the poor to make sure the markets: the right direction. they do the opposite. their short-term oriented, writes to the next election. they have their own agenda. they don't respond to the marketplace the way business has to do. they have their own agenda of interest groups. the bigger they get, the more harm they do on the less chance you have to improve your lot in life. >> host: how is it free markets make it moral? is morality part of capitalism? >> guest: morality is the b
calls for a government of national unity. >> barack obama breaks off his christmas holiday to resume talks on the u.s. budget crisis. >> the annual chaos computer club conference gets under way in hamburg with organizers warning that government internet surveillance is a growing threat. the international convoy for syria made a proposal in damascus where he is delivering talks. >> he will also be holding discussions in moscow as russia steps up its role in helping to find a political resolution to the conflict. the russian parliament says time is running out for damascus. >> it was a high-level meeting between syrian diplomats and the russian foreign minister. he made moscow's line clear -- the crisis has to be solved through political dialogue between the warring parties, but there was no mention of any new proposals to bring about that objective. the foreign ministry denied reports of a new peace plan from russia and the u.s. >> this plan does not exist. that is why it is not being discussed. with mr. brahimi and our american colleagues, we are trying to find a solution on the basi
after silvio berlusconi's party with her support for the government. >> we have a friendship feeling, but in the framework that is quite puzzling. this cannot constitute the basis, aside for other reasons, this cannot be the basis for affecting a proposal for me to become the leader of the moderates, he has said. that is the outgoing prime minister. what is next for him? >> is still speaking right now. he has announced he is going to launch some sort of change where he will lay out what whoever will the prime minister next year will have to follow to make sure what has been done by his government in the last year is not undone. he has stabilized the economy. now it needs to grow from alan. to grow, you need to pass even more unpopular reforms. he has said whoever wins, the party should not destroy what was billed. it was a pledge to the next government. do not and do what was done by us. do not criticize europe or try to get out of europe. play an active role in it. all of the points he was making almost directed at soviet gross tony who has said he will run for prime minister and ha
cpi would change the way the federal government calculate inflation. which could possibly save the government $300 billion over the next decade if implemented. normally every year, wages and prices go up. the consumer price index, the cpi measures how much they go up by tracking a basket of goods that americans typically buy. it's important, it's used to calculate cost of living adjustments on social security. checks pay a little more each year in line with inflation, as calculated by the cpi. now one potential flaw in the system, cpi assumes people don't change their basket of the price of meat goes up. they don't switch from meat to chicken because the price of beef has gone up. they don't switch from say, arugula to iceberg lettuce, it doesn't account for how behavior changes. chained cpi presents a chained basket of goods, measuring how people react to price changes, not simply the fact that prices have changed. now chained cpi would account for fact that you're buying more chicken when beef is too expensive. that could result in a slower rate of inflation, it saves the gov
the federal government calculates inflation, which could stave federal government $300 billion over the next decade if implemented. the consumer price index measures how much they go up by tracking a basket of goods that americans typically buy. this is important because it's used to calculate cost of living adjustments and social security. checks pay a little more each year in line with inflation as calculated by that consumer price index. now, one potential flaw in the system, consumer price index assumes people don't change their basket, if, say, the price of meat goes up. in other words, they don't switch from meat to chicken because the price of beef has gone up. they don't switch from, say, arugula to, i don't know, iceberg lettuce. it doesn't account for how behavior changes. chain consumer price index creates a chain basket of goods to measure inflation more accurately. it's measuring how people react to price changes not simply the fact that heiss pryces have changed. chained cpi could result in a slower rate of inflation over time, saves the government money on those cost of lifg a
. at the highest levels of united states government, we are committed to helping the drc and its neighbors in this cycle of violence and instability so we do not find ourselves back -- so that we do not find ourselves in another three years with another crisis in the vrsc. the secretary clinton, ambassador riesch, undersecretary for political affairs and ambassador windy sherman high and -- and i have all met with an spoken with the rwandan and rwanda and officials in the past few weeks for a rapid and peaceful resolution to the crisis. i have travelled to the region just last month with my british and french counterparts to press the condoleezza, rwanda in, and ugandan governments to work together and start the crisis and address the causes of instability. and all three governments reiterated to us their shared goals -- their share gold -- shared goals. all three indicated to was that the most abusive commanders are now under targeted sanctions and we have placed those same individuals under u.s. sanctions. talks between the garcia government and the environment -- m 23 began on december
"our form of government has no sense unless it is founded in the deeply felt religious faith and i do not care what it is." he received a much ridicule from his cultured despise years. his professed indifference to the major of the religious faith. it is the first part of the statement that deserves continuing attention. certainly many americans, perhaps the majority of them, agreed that democracy or at least our democracy, which is based on a belief in natural rights, presupposes religious faith. people believe this that all people are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights. there are two separate propositions that are pertinent to any consideration of the role of religion in american politics. one is an empirical question. is it a fact that the success of a democracy requires a religious people governing themselves by religious norms? the second question is a question of logic. does belief in america as distinctive and democracy, a limited government whose limits are defined by the natural rights of the government, do those entail religious beliefs? regarding the e
the proposed constitution, the government is doing little to calm passions. that is leaving many people feeling that the state is not interested in compromise. >> no one wants what is best for egypt. everyone wants what is good for themselves. we need people who want the best for the egyptian people who will work for a better egypt. >> in cairo, opponents continue to occupy tahrir square. the second round of fighting is taking place mainly in conservative rural areas. analysts predict the constitution will be ratified, but opponents say they intend to continue their protests. >> turning out to the u.s., president barack obama has just announced his nomination of senator john kerry to become secretary of state. >> john kerry is currently chairman of the senate foreign relations committee and has undertaken numerous diplomatic missions. he also ran unsuccessfully for president back in 2004. the move has been widely expected. observers say he should win easy confirmation in the senate. staying in washington, and president obama is increasing the pressure on the country's powerful gun lobby's and c
government today. abe led his party to a landslide victory in the recent general election. a special diet session will be convened on wednesday afternoon to choose the successor to outgoing prime minister yoshihiko noda. abe will be elected prime minister by voting in the upper and lower houses. he will be the first japanese prime minister in 64 years to be given a second chance. abe was prime minister for one year until he resigned in september 2007. abe plans to immediately start forming his cabinet. he'll hold a news conference in the evening to lay out his government's visions. the new government is not short on challenges. one urgent task is restoring the country's economy. japan's debt is projected to reach $12.8 trillion by next march. the ratio to the country's gross domestic product is 226%, the worst among developed nations. abe has pledged to halve the fiscal deficit by march 2016. the new government intends to finance its spending without borrowing by fiscal 2020. they hope to achieve the goal by cutting expenses. this would involve squeezing social security costs. all eyes ar
"newsline." shinzo abe is getting down to the business of governing japan for the second time. he says his new cabinet is taking all the challenges the country faces, including a sluggish economy and last year's disaster. abe explained in his news conference his cabinet is designed to overcome the crisis. he says reviving the economy is a top priority. >> translator: a strong economy is the basis of japan's power. reviving a strong economy is essential to japan's future. my cabinet will carry out bold financial policies, well-timed fiscal policies and a strategy to encourage private investment toward economic growth. my cabinet will carry out these economic policies and achieve results. >> are prime minister abe says he and his minister also devote energy to foreign policy. he says they will strengthen diplomatic and security policies. >> translator: we should rebuild our diplomacy to protect our national interests. we are facing many challenges in our relations with china, south korea and even with the united states on which japan's security is based. strengthening japan/ize lie yans is t
talk about entitlement spending cuts. are the democrats willing to accept that the government will spend less money? if this is the case, then they might find common ground. one important issue, of course, is going to be the members of the tea party. they are saying compromise is a bad word. of course, it will be difficult for them to find a compromise, to bring them into the boat. >> we had the meeting today. we have the special session on sunday. do you expect a compromise, or are we going over the cliff? >> this is really difficult to predict, but i will look today when they come out of the meeting weather they are willing to say, "well, we are looking forward to the next meeting." will they continue to talk? will they make jokes maybe? i think this might be an optimistic sign. if they come out and just say, "well, we are looking for a solution and the other side just do not want to compromise," then the blame game will start, and we probably will go over the fiscal cliff. >> thanks so much. >> the deadlock in washington has been weighing on investor sentiment today. in eur
that of nuclear energy. ronald reagan was right. thest thing to immortality is a government program. politicians are labeled with hot wind and we label the section gone with the wind. >> we have sending sib sidies in '92, has it been worth it. >> we are early inlet process. we have subsidized oil and coal and gas. we have done them from darn near a century. these don't look so bad. like it or not, the majority of americans believe that global warming is an issue. we need to develop clear energy sources. fossil fuels may be a difficult problem. we are subsidizing thingings. it is cheaper to produce energy from natural gas. it is a subsidies. other than it is natural gas there. it is 63 cents compared to $53. that is not a pay off to me. >> i will have to disagree with rick. last time wind energy had any impact was in the century. we have moved in oil and natural gas. but let's get rid of subsidies and let them sink or swim. wind energy will sink and we'll be better off. it is behathe sector we'll pour billions into it >> the wind farms are kind of methadone clinic. we'll reenact the two percent .
and government will find "patriots debate" worth their time. thank you all for coming. i would like to thank our authors or contributed essays and to a get to debate these topics extemporaneously in public square. the structure, the first hour will be conducting the debates on a relatively formal basis. first several war and then we can put questions and the note cards on your seat spirit of will take the committee for the event and turn things back over to my friend and co-editor. >> a living example of will we love to see which is that someone interested in national security law is undergraduate and the committee that will produce documents better able to be used for teaching purposes and then we hope one day we will end up in law school perhaps with an attorney. thank you for everything you've done. the logic, the framework as follows, the first part of the book deals with the war on terrorism demand utility second power which has a debate. homegrown terrorism which is a debate. in the interrogation issue which is a debate for abrams. and been moved to an area we thought, part two, very big i
violations. some senior government officials in moscow have spoken out against that law, but supporters argue the ban's necessary, because some adopted children have faced abuse by american families. joining me from moscow now is steve rosenberg. steve, you said he'd do it, he's done it. >> that's right, david. there's been one question that has dominated political life in moscow the last few days and that is will he or won't he? will president putin sign what is one of the most controversial laws he's been face with. yesterday he indicated he probably would and today he signed it. as you mentioned it has been very controversial because a number of ministers in his own government, including the russian foreign minister have publicly criticized the law and president putin's critics have accused him of playing politics with russian children. >> criticized it on humanitarian grounds. >> yes, absolutely. it's interesting to note that the bill we're talking about, the law we're talking about is wider than simply banning adoptions. it's russia's retaliation for the act that bans russians officials
many japanese to question the use of atomic energy. the former government said it would aim to take all react ors off line within a couple of decades but now a new government is in power and promising a different approach. >> reporter: kaho izumitani is putting everything on the table when it comes to energy policy. they will explore possibilities including restarting nuclear reactors. >> translator: we need to decide our energy policy based on technical assessments. we will not start with the conclusion of halting nuclear power generation by the 2030s. >> reporter: the previous administration led by former prime minister yoshihko noda drafted an energy policy that stated the government would aim to shut down all nuclear plants by the 2030s. before last year's accident in fukushima, nuclear power accounted for 26% of the total energy supply in japan. currently only two out of 50 reactors in the country are online adding a mere 3% to the supply. fossil fuels are taking up the slack. utilities are paying more to import liquified natural gas to fire thermal plants. many are planning to rai
to avoid the fiscal cliff as the government starts taking steps to buy more time before the u.s. hits the debt ceiling. the yen hits a two-year low against the dollar as the new japanese government battles to weaken currency. exports are rising, pushing the nikkei to its strongest gain in 20 years. .shares of toyota are heading higher after the u.s. settled a class action lawsuit. the $1 billion payment is already priced in. okay. welcome to "worldwide exchange." plenty of news to watch out of washington. all of this week, we thought it would be a quiet one. but i won't be inside the beltway if they want to get something done. the u.s. will hit the $16.4 trillion debt ceiling come monday. in a letter to congressional leaders, geithner says treasury will begin taking steps to save the government about $2 billion. geithner says it's harder to predict a time frame because the ongone fiscal cliff talks make it difficult to forecast next year's budget. among the measures treasury will take including suspending state and local government securities and investments in the federal employee pe
. recall that in past years a couple decades ago when we became disenchanted with the government and military of pakistan, we cut off militaryoff assistance to the pakistani military and that led to very negative consequences so while some of these choices are very difficult, i am inclined in that direction of greater rather than lesser engagement. i don't think there's any point in just wiping our hands of these situations. lou: you talk about declining powers, does the obama administration's intelligence council in a new report i just referred to talk about the day which the united states will no longer be a superpower but the so-called first among equals.t m they project around 2030. your thoughts and your reckoning on whether or not you agree with that, they will come if not declining of other powers. >> i certainly think since the financial crisis back in 2007, 2008, there has been a tendency to write this down, if you will, but i think many of those assessmentsit have been unduly pessimistic and even downright wrong at times. we are still the most powerful economy in the wo
into england. fly them over there, seized the airfield. the shock might be so great that the british government will cave in or negotiate your instead what the germans did was, of course they stop at the ocean. then he turned south and they wanted to knock france out of the war, which is what they did. they entered paris on june 16, i think. the government in paris led to the south. they were practically in a different city every day. and churchill hoped and pleaded with the french to continue fighting. both countries have pledged, one to another, that they would not drop out of the war and make a separate peace, unless they were released from this pledge by the other. the french began to think that they would want to make a separate peace, and they began to talk to the british about this. churchill said no, we can't release you from that pledge. we want you to keep fighting all the way down to the mediterranean, if you have to. and if you have to across the mediterranean, keep fighting from north africa. and a big part of the reason was that the french fleet was a very, very large fleet. many
conditions, does the government have the rule and saying you need to ensure preexisting conditions? >> guest: yes, but she don't want to join the premium below the cost of care because the insurance company isn't going to want you and is going to treat you poorly. so what we recommend is being able to ensure an advance against preexisting conditions so if you have to pay a higher premium on insurance that pays a higher premium. but also we need affordable insurance. we don't have it dandruff on the care. if you own your own insurance, take a job to job. >> host: the employer system, is it time to not be the system? >> guest: i believe in free markets. employers do what they need to do. but let's have a level playing field. once in every state make it illegal for the employer to buy for employees insurance they can take with them for the next job. we need to abolish laws, turn everything around and encourage affordable insurance. >> host: what is the argument in favor of having it divided by states? >> guest: i can't think of any argument i find persuasive. you want to buy insurance across st
of security among the population. right now we are relying upon congolese government to provide as security. in afghanistan, we've got a questionable partner in the karzai government. that has been difficult. we have a less than credible partner in the congolese government. in afghanistan, we have gone through these stabilization operations as an alternative way to provide security at the local level with the villages, communities, whereby we have been providing some arms and training to the local population there so that they can provide their own security. obviously, the karzai government has been opposed to that. are there any opportunities for any alternative strategies, given the nature of the in theese government any d drc, mr. affleck? >> i will yield to an expert fellow panelist year, but one of the -- the basic issue, and one that will go a long way and that i alluded to earlier, climbing some influence to president -- are applying some influence to president kabila so that payment is made to his troops. if there was one stroke of automatically improve people's lives, that would do
with the gold standard. now, what could the greek government have done? two greek prime ministers. one from 2004 to 2009. in greece, greece has had experience with that since 1974 after the expiration of parliamentary democracy. government, regardless of which party is in government, the accelerator to create some kind of flimsy growth, at some point it became clear that we had a cliff. our debt situation would get too much. and then we would hit the brakes. austerity. which creates increased unemployment. but nevertheless, the debt was manageable. they did this up until 2004. 2004 was accelerated because of the olympics. the next government should have stopped it. but unfortunately government is government. government kept the foot firmly on the accelerator. why? because german capital was flowing to the country at cheap rates, financing ponzi schemes. it is just like the subprime market here where people were coerced to take loans that could not afford. similarly in greece. so, you had executives coming to greece, bribing politicians. the greek government -- they did not listen. then 2008. the
of their recruiting. >> they realize this but it would be hard for any government agent to say i'm going to support a buy polar agent who is sleeping with an as lamb i can radical. >> in some ways it highlights those things more in terms of one person. through the whole journey of frost nixon, his relationship which garn in a small theater in london, then broadway, then a movie. the very first preview performance of frost nixon in a theater in london, the entire back row was lawyers, the third preview david there was having been given the all clear or told you should go see it yourself and he was shaken by it to begin w. for a man who is incredibly generous and warm and positive and supportive of everything, i think he felt very confused by how he should react to this. and as the whole thing went on as it started to become clear this was going to be a massive hit in terms of the play and the theater version of it, he started to get behind it because he's a very good business man and he started to go, well, okay, there is a certain amount of this i don't believe actually happened and is not true and
reports on the military and government failings in the war in afghanistan. nancy gives him an editor at large and michael duffy, executive editor for time magazine chronicle the relationship between the u.s. presidents in the president's club in side the world's most exclusive fraternity. political commentator kevin phillips recounts what he believes was the most important year of the american revolution which was 1775, a good year for revolutions. for an extended list of links to various publications, 2012 novel book selections visit the book tv website, booktv.org or our facebook page facebook.com/booktv . >> up next on book tv, richard wolff and david bersamian talk about our economic crisis and argue that it can be traced back to the 1970's when our economic system shifted from benefiting a vast majority of americans to one which mostly benefits only the very rich. this is about an hour-and-a-half. [applause] >> good to see you will hear. let's cut quickly to the chase. what is it and the dna of capitalism that makes this so unstable? >> since the beginning of economics as a disc
a social security, medicare, medicaid. that is not the only entitlements. every government program that has a retirement benefit, a health-care benefit, those are entitlements, two, up to and including the entitlements for the congressman. let's be fair. when they start talking about entitlements and hold it to those three items, let's hold their feet to the fire and make them talk about entitlements for the other folks, too. host: appreciate you calling this morning. donna writes about this on twitter. if that to facebook here. -- back to you facebook here. budget showdown hits the keep week. that is of the front page reminding us of the deadline looming. it is a bloomberg story here out of the district. i you can watch the byplay here on the c-span that works with the president heading back to town tonight. the senate and house are due back tomorrow. billy from jacksonville, florida, to life for waiting. caller: i am very optimistic but i worry that the president will not get a chance because lindsey gramm already stated he will fight. i think there will already be another big fight for t
before they went into government. but about the queen and the family and lifting the vail. you thrift veil and this is an extraordinary world we've never seen inside of. so "the queen r queen" came directly from the deal. >> what did tony blair think of it? >> next question. >> i want to know president obama said "homeland" is his favorite show. my question is when you're dealing with live, real people who you are portraying or in the case of "homeland" or "24" when you're trying to deal with agencies that you are representing, what is that interaction like? we were talking a little bit in the room next door, maybe you can answer michael, how is tony blair's perception changed as a result of those films or the queen's perception changed in the minds of the public then we can talk about "homeland" and "24"? >> there are many things that you realize that you are working with when you do a film or a tv show that is -- has so much political emphasis. and one of the things is inevitably you come up against the agenda of people in terms of the agendas they have for looking at and judging po
important single commodity. the south refuse to sell cotton unless the british and french government recognize its independence, which put tremendous pressure on europe to intervene in favor of the confederate. the european statesmen at the beginning of 1862, considered the unions caused to be hopeless. quote it is the highest degree likely that the north will not be able to subdue the south. british prime minister lord pomerance and told us for an officers. meanwhile, the lincoln government appeared overwhelmed. congress and the white house were in the hands of a political party that it never government before. the treasury department was broke. federal spending was multiplied as never before. in 1862, the u.s. government spent six times as much money as it spent in 1861. and where would it come from? northern banks, and an economic panic had closed their exchange windows in late december, refusing to redeem paper money. meanwhile, rebel soldiers menace washington from nearby manassas virginia where they had routed the union army a few months earlier. confederate artillery they atom
to government and different sets of divisions and values and everything he did in that timeframe he kept trying to tethered to this big idea and when i wrote to the book of course we didn't know how things would end up on november 6, 2012, but i looked at how she developed the governing strategy, and they're really culminated in november, so this is the back story to what happened in this presidential campaign. >> david korn, showdown is the most recent book and we are here at the national press club. >>> robert discusses the role that geography has played in shaping the defense and talks about the role that it plays in the future. this is about ten minutes. >> good evening, welcome and thank you for joining us. my name is richard fontaine. i'm the president for the center of new american security. it's a pleasure to welcome you all here to celebrate the publication of robert kaplan's new book the reason geography what they tell us about the coming conflict in the battle against the state. i've heard it said before that you all very great author by reading his books not by buying them -- they w
. this now is an admission which the government has been very reluctant to make but which reflects the actual reality. so there you have the full -- politics and religion because the weapon, the motivation of the foot soldiers, is to create an islamic state in nigeria. it's not something that anybody dreams of. there are videos, the usual two rifles crossing each other, and we want an islamic state. in fact, one of their leaders went so far, when the government was -- political leaders were proposing amnesty and talk, no, going to talk to the president as a christian, until he converts. then we're willing to sit down and negotiate with him. and so each time i hear the government say, oh, please come on, talk to us, we'll listen now. we don't know what you want. i said, don't be stupid. they said it so often and you know very well what their motivation is. that is the reason for the devastation of the north today. a country in which utter years, years of independence, certain sections of the country consider the rest nonmuslims, whether christians, or whatever, as subhumans. disposable materia
will officially re-sign from his post on friday. he stressed that italy's next government must avoid backtracking on reforms. elections are due to return in january. sylvia berlusconi met up with cnbc and began by asking him whether he will be running in the upcoming elections. >> translator: yes. obviously, this wasn't my original intention or a desirable option. i had to surrender to reality. and my sense of responsibility convinced me to run again for a premiership. actually, this need come from the polls. a angelino alfamo is capable, but only my participation would have brought back all the voters who supported us in 2008 which represented almost 40% of the total of italian voters. i had to admit what the data was saying as i did in 2004. i feel the need to return to the political arena to prevent the country from being delivered into the hands of a leftist party that isn't at all social democratic, but has its roots firmly pointed in the communist orthodox party. >> under market and in europe, there is some concern that your return in politics may bring back italy to the latest borrow of 20
. it is pragmatic. the united states federal government -- unless europe is dollarized, unless they do not have dollars to spend purchasing the net exports of those who have surpluses, then they will stop having surplus. this is the surplus recycling mechanism. thus, we have the 20 years of the golden age. the 1950's and the 1960's. a period of immense stability very low inflation. universal growth. we had other problems. the lease from the macroeconomic point of view, it was a golden age. why did it end? because the global surplus of recycling mechanism could no longer be sustained. why? because the united states stopped having a surplus by the end of the 1960's. how can you recycle surplus if you cannot have it. enter a young turk in 1971. well, paul volcker -- that name may ring a bell. in 1971, paul volcker was an unknown working for another american. henry kissinger, who you may have heard of. before he became secretary of state. he was still national security advisor. volcker's paper, which are when i read a few years ago, i thought it was the most remarkable document ever to emerge from
back then is it's not going to work if you put in this year a big surge in government spending, even if that makes gdp go up this year, next year it goes down again. so if we're going to do to policies they're going to recommend, we had to know it would be great next year, and we could afford to lose the 2% growth, and we'd take the stimulus away. since that didn't seem plausible at the time, what we argued back then -- i could e-mail you testimonies -- was that we need to pursue policies somewhat reminiscent of what we see in the 4% growth chapter now. we were talking about what next steps should be, and there wasn't a democratic senator in that hearing who was willing to defend the stimulus on the record. and i was, i was being, you know, pretty combative in my testimony, and nobody argued with me. and the point is that the economy is still terrible. i think 2% is actually optimistic for what we're growing right now. and everybody wants to do something to fix it, and that's a great opportunity for a president that's willing to try something new. >> thank you. and i just wanted to e
thing the next government needs to do is actually nothing. if it does nothing, if it doesn't reverse the reforms -- >> what's interesting is what berlusconi is campaigning on is austerity. he's running on an ant anti-austerity pro eu package. while it's untenable, it does have a certain amount of certainly backtracking the fiscal returns for them. >> exactly. this property tax, i think that's a cause for concern. if you were to repeal that, the fiscal position on would be unsustainable and he would have to raise taxes elsewhere to make up for that. that would be some messy negotiations with him on a european level. markets would be very concerned already heading into the elections. the more noise we hear, the higher italian borrowing costs would be and if italian borrowing costs rise, one of the very important parameters which led to this drop in debt to gdp over these 15 years heading into the crisis would not be fulfilled any more and italy's position would be unsustainable because of all that noise. >> it sounds like a catalyst should this fall into place in 2013. that still remai
and these changes will produce a government pan dated calamity. it was only agreed to because it was never meant to be enacted. it was just a fail safe. it's not working right now. it's brutal and wrong headed as it might particularly be, let's just say at this particular moment as the president closed tonight, it said things are just getting better. it's the worst mistake. there's just too much hatred between the two parties to head it off. put simply, sometimes i think they would rather throw us back into recession than to portray their principle business compromising. the only way these politicians know how to save the nation's village is to burn it down. the opposite irony of today's session. given the wanton hardship that beckons if we fall off the cliff and chance that no deal is possible let alone one that can be reached in a few day's time, why weren't we down much more? why weren't we off gigantically? why didn't we fall off the stock cliff today? why didn't we detonate? why do we have one of those down 500 points days? that seemed reasonable. we said 7% when congress rejected the initi
and they might be influenced by some violent popular culture. but how is the government going to identify the darkest thoughts in people's minds before they do anything? well, what government can do easily, however, is make it much harder for these people to have access to guns. a few hours before the newtown murders, a man entered a school in the province in china, obviously, mentally disturbed, he tried to kill as many children as he could. but all he had access to was a knife. the result, despite many injured, not one child died. the problems that for deuproduc newtown mas ker. you find my column on cnn.com/fareed. let's get started. >>> so, let's get right to it. a conversation about the real economic problems this country faces on my right and on their right glen hubbard the former chief economic adviser of cheney campaign. on my left, peter orzack, obama former budget director and sort of in the middle, the economist, economics editor and kristen editor of reuters digital. i promised we were going to get past the cliff. but i have to ask a few questions about it. you don't think it'
. after a week of violence and attempts to gain control, the key government buildings are located here. after certain days of protests, making a public plea for calm. >> i am deeply sad that this is leading to clashes between protesters and the police forces. this crime was not justified, but violence will not serve. >> many feel the government has lost. especially after events over the weekend. police fired several rounds of tear gas and used water cannons to break up the protests. scores of people were injured on both sides. some were critically wounded. they were angry after the her with a gang rape last week, when a young woman was attacked so broadly, she is fighting for life. it goes beyond this one incident. people want a strong action from -- from thent's government. until then, they are prepared to keep the heat on. >> a delay until tuesday. the constitution in egypt was supposed to be passed, but now, the electoral commission says they will be looking at allegations of irregularities in the voting process. we were sent this report from cairo. >> egypt, on the brink of a new e
for anyone looking to become more familiar with how government works and the ins and outs of capitol hill. >> julie seger on c-span on verizon. c-span has been brought to you by your television provider as a public service. >> next, it is a global look at the economy with a speech by greek economist. among his many books, the economics professor recently minotaur" andobal natar we will show you as much as we can before the house gavels in at 2:00 p.m. eastern. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, france, -- friends, this is a singular honor to be a guest in this temple of civic life. thanks to all the good people for making this possible, to my publisher, the staff that are manning the barricades outside. my novel is debt crisis and the future of the world economy. i will be arguing that there is no such thing as a debt crisis. there is no debt crisis in the united states of america and europe, and there is no such thing as the debt crisis in my own country, which is nevertheless being consumed by debt. you know the joke about balloonist. the balloon has been blown off isrse, and at some p
an actual all-time high again. anyway, among the catalysts, a new pro-business government preparing to assume leadership, incoming prime minister shinzo abe. what is it, 50,000 that it has to get to? >> 39,000 i believe is the peak. >> who's counting, right? that's a ways off. >> yeah. far away. >> shinzo abe has been putting pressure on the bank of japan to raise its inflation target in hopes of extricating the country from two decades of deflation. i guess if you just raised the target -- >> that would help. >> okay. >> it doesn't matter what your target is if you can't hit it. >> we found that out here. >>> meantime, in europe markets are closed for the boxing day holiday. seems weird to do it just for a bunch of people to -- >> box up the gifts and return them. >> it's not a -- >> bad, i know. >> it is boxing. what kind of boxing are we -- boxer rebellion? >> i've never understood boxing day. >> we have to look it up. >> i literally have no idea. >> or it's on google. no, is there anything on google that is different? let me see. just a regular -- >> is there their our way to fi
with the government's first position on guantanamo bay was no-man's land they already rented from cuba the majority was to the extent that the law exists in guantanamo bay. there is no other power, certainly castro is not controlling what was happening there. so, to the government said habeas corpus doesn't extend to guantanamo bay so for that purpose of this part of the usa and a follow on cases in in the lower court so all of the returns are in. >> the next question is 1i know you never get. what is your view of the nomination process that comes from fort lewis and how might it be improved to make it less frustrating were demeaning to? >> it wasn't always the way it has been for the nominations. it would include our chief justice, justice alito, justice so why -- sotomayor and justice kagan. people decided to go along party lines. contrast that with the way that it was when i was nominated in 1993 in the justice breyer the following year. my biggest supporter of the senate judiciary committee was senator orrin hatch and he confirmed that and he wrote an autobiography in which he takes great pride
the government, better be a buyer than a seller. compromise is far, far more likely than not, despite last night's shenanigashenanigans. jack in florida, jack? >> caller: i read your book. i enjoyed it very much. >> thank you. >> caller: i'm following a sector rotation strategy with some of my investments. currently in the material sector. and hoping to catch more of the housing uprise. but with the fiscal cliff looming, i was wondering if you would advise more defenseless strategy like consumer staples or something going into the new year. >> what i was thinking i told a friend of mine today conagra reported an amazing number. that's the kind of thing i would think about. nice yield. good growth. i think that's the best idea. why don't we go to brooks in ohio. brooks was here. brooks? >> caller: my question is about abbott, the split, how's it going down and which side are you on? >> good news today. the split will be included in the s&p which is why it was up. abbott is going higher. that's why my travel trust owns it. things seem dysfunctional in washington but even now it's better to be a bu
both on the government side, the reform side, as well as currencies. so i think there's definitely a handful of risks. and you have to kind of -- the play for emerging markets is change. i think when you used to invest as efts, you have to look at the markets differently. i think you have to be more careful. >> all right. let's focus on india. i know you just got back from a long trip where you were evaluating the investment landscape in india. obviously we've seen a lot of foreign investors allocate capital into this market. we are looking at the rupee depreciating significantly over the last year. the company dealing with other problems including lack of infrastructure, some policy changes. what is your recent -- i guess your updated outlook on india going forward? >> well, the local market has justice done phenomenally in 2012. up 25%. but it didn't help u.s. dollar investors because the currency fell the same amount. so really everyone kind of broke even even though the market took off this year. i think india is still a market where you want to keep building positions graduall
for government to keep raising the value added tax. we've seen it happened in spain, italy and greece and wherever it's tried. adam: i lived in spain a long time ago. i guess you realize you don't paying it at the time but things are more expensive. david: thank you, gang. thank you very much. thanks to the company. thanks to you for watching. now here are dagen and dennis. hi, gang. dagen: merry christmas. love to your family. david: thank you. same to yours. dagen: i'm dagen mcdowell everybody. dennis: i'm dennis neal -- kneale. dagen: is it the fiscal cliff fears that have shoppers down this season? retailers are reporting slowing sales over the last couple of weeks. dennis: a woman fired for being too attractive and a supreme court says it is legal. dagen: i will bite my tongue because it is the top of the hour and stocks now and every 15 minutes. nicole petallides at the new york stock exchange. hey nicole. nicole: i look forward to hearing more about that particular story as i watch the stock market here, i do see the dow is down about 1/3 of 1%. majority of the dow components a
say at least 20 people, many of them children, have been killed by government shelling in the north of the country, and in a setback for the government, the country's military police chief has defected. then he says he felt the army was no longer acting in the interests of the syrian people. >> the officer in this video identifies himself as the head of the military police. he says the syrian army is not protecting a country. instead, it is destroying cities and committing massacres against unarmed civilians. his defection is another blow to the regime, which is trying to contain rebel advances. the opposition is again reporting successes. this unverified internet video is said to show bubbles seizing a town on the turkish border. -- rebels seizing a town on the turkish border. the fighting continues, but in damascus, u.n. special envoy lakhdar brahimi continues his pursuit for peace. >> we have reason to hope that the meetings will have a positive outcome. we do hope so. >> for now, syrians can only hope for peace. opposition activists say the conflict has now killed more than 45,0
. opposition activists say a government warplane fired on civilians while they were waiting to buy bread. at least 15 people were reported killed. the fighting continues to rage in other parts of the country. in the northern province of aleppo, rebels said they have shifted their strategy. they have been surrounding military bases and airports loyal to the regime, but the army has kept up the pressure. this unverified video is said to show a government attack on a suburb of damascus. it is relatively calm in the capital itself, but for the city's christian community, there is little festive spirit to be felt during the holiday. >> this christmas, i am praying for syria. you cannot feel the christmas atmosphere this year. we hope next year will be better. >> security concerns have put a damper on the celebrations, and midnight mass was rescheduled for the afternoon. christians there said they prayed for peace in their city. >> now, reports from cassocks and say that a military transport plane has crashed in the south of the country, killing at least 27 people -- reports from kazakhstan. t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 111 (some duplicates have been removed)